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Books


  • How Hudson Stuck's Ascent of Denali Boosted Recognition of Indigenous Alaskans

    by Patrick Dean

    Hudson Stuck came to America from England in 1885 and lived a life that echoed the era's adventure books, with one important twist. He leveraged his fame from summitting North America's highest peak to advocate for the rights of native Alaskans, beginning with insisting that the mountain he climbed be known by its indigenous name, Denali. 


  • Reflections on Fredrik Logevall's "JFK: Coming of Age in the American Century, 1917-1956"

    by Sheldon M. Stern

    Fredrik Logevall's new JFK biography is one of the first by a historian who did not personally experience the Kennedy years. Longtime JFK Library historian says this is all to the good, as Logevall makes extensive use of available primary sources to place Kennedy's political and diplomatic views in the context of his formative experiences in wartime. 


  • How Venetians Invented Health Care

    by Meredith F. Small

    It's been widely discussed during this pandemic year that Venetians invented the quarantine. But the author of a new book on Venice's history of innovation argues that it was just one of the public health measures for which we can thank them.


  • Is There Anything Left to Learn about Hitler?

    by James Thornton Harris

    Volker Ullrich presents a picture of a leader whose "egocentrism... inability to self-criticize…tendency to overestimate himself... contempt for others and lack of empathy" made him willing to destroy his nation along with himself, but warns that the Third Reich was "a dictatorship of consent." 


  • How Two French Introverts Quietly Fought the Nazis

    by Jeffrey H. Jackson

    Two introverted French Lesbian artists conducted a campaign of subversion against the Nazis occupying the Island of Jersey that a trial judge called "more dangerous than soldiers." A new book explains how.


  • The Troubling History of a Black Man's Heart

    by Chip Jones

    What Virginia doctors saw as a triumphant achievement was a devastating indictment of medical racism and institutional disregard for the dignity of a Black man and his family.


  • Native Actors Outside the Frame

    by Liza Black

    Liza Black's new book traces the lives of prominent and anonymous Native actors, examinng the way that Hollywood films exploited their labor and images while spinning narratives that justified the historical conquest of Native lands.


  • The Proud City: Patrick Abercrombie's Unfulfilled Plan for Rebuilding London

    by Simon Jenkins

    In 1942, the British government endorsed a plan that turned the Blitz into an opportunity for massive centrally-planned rebuilding of London. This was a break from the previous anarchic pattern of development, and, for better or worse, today's eclectic metropolis owes its form to the failure of the plan.