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Historians/History


  • Ideologies and U.S. Foreign Policy International History Conference: Day 2 Coverage

    by Miriam Lipton

    What was the global significane of the Civil War? What exactly is the definition of “freedom?” How are Donald Duck, Indiana Jones, and anti-modernizationistsconnected? The second day of the Ideologies and U.S. Foreign Policy International History Conference was highlighted by experts’ bold answers to these ambitious questions.


  • The Origins of the Lost Cause Myth

    by M. Andrew Holowchak

    States’ rights and slavery, while theoretically distinct, were in praxis intertwined. Here's what a Jeffersonian analysis of Jubal Early’s lost-cause apologia can teach us.


  • Material History and A Victorian Riddle Retold

    by Amy G. Richter

    A historian of nineteenth-century American culture, I study the significance ordinary women and men gave to furniture, art, and decoration. Recently my mother's dementia challenged my scholarship by reminding me of the personal meanings of objects and the intimate work they do.


  • Where Did the Indigenous Community Mothers Go?

    by Candace Wellman

    Indigenous community mothers seem to have been an uncomfortable truth for historians and other writers that did not fit with the Euro-American mythology they sought to build around “the first white woman” in town. The result was their now-conspicuous absence.


  • George Mason: Lost Founder

    by William G. Hyland Jr.

    Why George Mason rightly deserves to be considered one of the fathers of our national government.